Category: Uncategorized (Page 2 of 5)

The ABC of Contemporary Capital | Session 3

As a part of this course, I’m sharing rough drafts of pieces of a manuscript I am working on, a sort of textbook on Marx’s political economy.

I’m experimenting with crowd sourcing the revision process. I invite you to read and offer your thoughts using the free social annotation program, Hypothesis:

The ABC of Capital: A Textbook | Session 3

To get started with Hypothesis, click the above link and then click “Sign Up” in the right hand sidebar to create a free Hypothesis account. Once you are logged into Hypothesis you are free to make comments on the text.

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The ABC of Contemporary Capital | Session 2

As a part of this course, I’m sharing rough drafts of pieces of a manuscript I am working on, a sort of textbook on Marx’s political economy.

I’m experimenting with crowd sourcing the revision process. I invite you to read and offer your thoughts using the free social annotation program, Hypothesis:

The ABC of Capital: A Textbook | Session 2

To get started with Hypothesis, click the above link and then click “Sign Up” in the right hand sidebar to create a free Hypothesis account. Once you are logged into Hypothesis you are free to make comments on the text.

Previous Class | Course Home | Next Class

The ABC of Contemporary Capital | Session 1

As a part of this course, I’m sharing rough drafts of pieces of a manuscript I am working on, a sort of textbook on Marx’s political economy.

I’m experimenting with crowd sourcing the revision process. I invite you to read and offer your thoughts using the free social annotation program, Hypothesis:

The ABC of Capital: A Textbook | Session 1

To get started with Hypothesis, click the above link and then click “Sign Up” in the right hand sidebar to create a free Hypothesis account. Once you are logged into Hypothesis you are free to make comments on the text.

Course Home | Next Class

New Course: The ABC of Contemporary Capital

Marx’s mission statement at the heart of the Grundrisse reads as follows: “The exact development of the concept of capital is necessary since it is the fundamental concept of modern economics, just as capital itself is the foundation of bourgeois society. The sharp formulation of the presuppositions of the (capital) relation must bring out all the contradictions of bourgeois production, as well as the boundary where it drives beyond itself.”

The aim of this free live-streamed course is to survey Marx’s political economic writings in 13 sessions to assess how far he succeeded in this mission and how far his findings illuminate contemporary conditions.

Videos and materials:

Figures:

[Video]: David Harvey and Costas Lapavitsas: After Neoliberalism? Covid, Crisis and the Future of Capitalism

The Havens Wright Center for Social Justice
The University of Wisconsin-Madison
November 2, 2021

David Harvey is Distinguished Professor of Anthropology & Geography at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York (CUNY), and the Director of Research, Center for Place, Culture and Politics. His highly influential books include Rebel Cities: From the Right to the City to the Urban Revolution (2012); A Companion to Marx’s Capital (2013); Social Justice and the City (2009); A Brief History of Neoliberalism (2005); The New Imperialism (2005); Paris, Capital of Modernity (2005); Limits to Capital (rev. ed, 2007); Spaces of Capital: Towards a Critical Geography (2001); Spaces of Hope (2000); Justice, Nature, and the Geography of Difference (1997); The Condition of Postmodernity (1991); and The Urbanization of Capital (1985).

Costas Lapavitsas is a professor of economics at the School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London. He was elected as a member of the Greek Parliament for Syriza in January 2015. He is the author of numerous books including The Left Case Against the EU (Polity Press, 2018), Marxist Monetary Theory: Collected Papers (Brill, 2017), Word for word: Writings on the Greek Crisis (Athens: Topos Press, 2014), Profiting Without Producing: How Finance Exploits Us All (2013) and Crisis in the Eurozone (2012).

Reflections on an academic life

Human Geography, (November 2021). https://doi.org/10.1177/19427786211046291.

I have written quite a few books over the course of my academic career, beginning with Explanation in Geography (Harvey, 1969) and most recently Marx, Capital and the Madness of Economic Reason (Harvey, 2017). I am often asked which of these many books I consider to be the most important. My invariable answer is Limits to Capital (Harvey, 1982) and Paris, Capital of Modernity (Harvey, 2003), the first draft of which appeared in Consciousness and the Urban Experience (Harvey, 1985). Why those two bodies of work rather than others, such as The Condition of Postmodernity (Harvey, 1989) or A Brief History of Neoliberalism (Harvey, 2005) which are by far my most cited works?

The answer lies in what for me was the driving force, the central animating theme, of my thinking, reading, and writing from the late 1960s on. During the 1960s I had already left behind the particularist and nominalist perspectives of traditional regional geography that dominated the discipline in favor of a more “scientific” universalizing and theoretical approach to the subject. I was aided in this by the rise of a more quantitative approach to geography (powerfully advocated by Dick Chorley and Peter Haggett during my doctoral research years at Cambridge), incorporating statistical methods and more positivist methods. It was in this spirit (and very much under their influence) that I wrote Explanation in Geography. In the conclusion to that work I ended with the hopeful utopian slogan: “by our theories you shall know us.” That slogan is, I believe, more relevant than ever.

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Video: The Anti-Capitalist Chronicles – Book Talk with David Harvey & Vijay Prashad

David Harvey, Vijay Prashad, Michael Blim, and Chris Caruso
The People’s Forum
July 23, 2021

Order The Anti-Capitalist Chronicles direct from Pluto Press, or

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Interview: What Would Marx Do About Joe Biden?

What Would Marx Do About Joe Biden?
Bad Faith Podcast with Briahna Joy Gray and Virgil Texas
April 1, 2021

Interview on Pacifica Radio’s Letters & Politics: David Harvey on a History of Neoliberalism and the Current Economic Crisis

Interview on Pacifica Radio’s Letters & Politics with Mitch Jeserich
March 29, 2021

Audio version.

Video: Post-Capitalism, Automation and Revolution

(spoken in English, subtitled in Portuguese) First in a series of short clips recorded on the occasion of the publication of the Brazilian edition of Marx, Capital and the Madness of Economic Reason by Boitempo.

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